The Spark of the Arab Uprise

The other day I learned through a conversation with an Arabic speaking girl whose words I intuitively trusted – as she was obviously very clever and informed – a completely different perspective about what is going on in Egypt and Tunisia. Prior to that, it was more like a blur of various network channels recounting this massive unrest in Egypt and Tunisia. When I heard newscasters the other day on CNN groping to allude to the cause, pointing to the economics of the area, I decided that it might be of interest to give you this less widely available perspective, arriving from the Arab intellectual left.

Sure, economic aspects are woven into the core; in a world in which the material aspect of living dominates. This is about several secular Arab governments, in which the “democratic” leaders have elected themselves to tyrannically continue their rule, with seeming complicity coming from the vote, due to mass fraud re-electing them in landslide victories.

Within the last year there was an incident in Egypt in which a man was killed in the process of standing up for his rights. He became a symbol of people’s oppression. In the last months, an anonymous Egyptian citizen with internet savvy set up a Facebook page, as a memorial to honor this fallen man, who has become a symbol of people’s frustration. His site was widely embraced. So this person’s news feed was already becoming entrenched.

What just occurred in the similarly authoritarian Arab government of Tunisia in the last weeks, inadvertently sparked the uprising in Egypt. The unprecedented display of public outcry against their leader, spread electronically across borders, via the digital information tools which enable people to access information and communicate with one another; as opposed to being fed misinformation “news” from sources that inhibit real communication.

I was told that in a number of these secular Arab countries, the repression is similar to that of the GDR, German Democratic Republic that was established as the Soviet zone of occupied Germany in (1949-1989). Same, same, but different. In these countries in which the leader’s tenuous grip of his power is manifested through building walls to control information, one must always be careful about literally ANYthing you say in public. Spies and informants abound, who probably often out of their own fear of the regime, opt to inform on someone who says something critical of the regime, just to get some points and maybe a few other benefits, for having done so. Therefore, people remain silent, and solemn, fearful of doing anything that could elicit danger to themselves or their families. That’s another reason that these protests that have occurred in the streets of Egypt and Tunisia are dramatically unprecedented. What’s happening today is coming from years of oppression, with tensions silently kept under a pressurized lid. Suddenly, the pent up fear, distrust and hostility has been ignited.

Several weeks ago in Tunisia, a young male student, who like many people in his country, was finding it very difficult to find any means of supporting himself. He resorted to a meager income through vending fruits and vegetables in the streets. When one day he was confronted by the police who asked him for his license to do this, he explained that in fact, he was doing this as a last resort, having found no other type of work, and that he was a student, and could they please let him go in peace. The police responded by claiming that they were going to arrest him, and that he was going to have to go to jail, no choice, that day.

The student at this moment responded in his desperation, to grab a can of flammable liquid, poured it over his head there in the vicinity of the police, and lit it. He burned to death in front of them, in the middle of the day in the middle of the street. His silent last gasp of renouncing this hopeless situation was watched by people in horror. The measure so extreme, that in fact, his action sparked everyone around him, to explode with fury and anger. His drastic action is that of a silent, suffering martyr, symbolizing his desperation within the shackles of this hostile government. He has inadvertently ignited an audacity among the people, fueled by fury, to revolt.

When this same anonymous (out of self preservation) Egyptian alerted his following on his RNN feed on Facebook of the events in Tunisia, the message spread like fire to Egypt. http://www.rassd.com leads you to this facebook page:

RNN.NEWS

Learning of these events among their Arab brothers in Tunisia, was enough to simultaneously ignite the passion and fury of the Egyptians, who have been similarly victimized by their authoritarian government, in which expressing one’s opinion can be fatal.

Last Wednesday, January 26th has been called “Egypt’s Violent Day of Anger”. All of this actually facilitated through the internet sources, the vehicle of information for the people. It kindled the Egyptian people’s fury over Hosni Mubarak’s oppressive 30 year rule. And has since been reaching the Diaspora of Arab people throughout the world.

And read further for more insightful information, especially from Monde Diplio, the English version of Monde Diplomatique.

http://mondediplo.com/openpage/the-corruption-game

http://mondediplo.com/openpage/the-year-of-living-dangerously

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1519282

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/29/world/middleeast/29mubarak.html?_r=2&nl=todaysheadlines&emc=tha22

Advertisements

About carolkeiter
Aspiring writer, artist, musician and composer who was born and raised in the United States and has resided in several European countries. Communication is my forte; both through using various tools and in approaching people of divers backgrounds to gather information. Speak conversational - advanced intermediate - French, German and Spanish. Love interacting with people in cultural centers as much as going to remote places to learn more about the different creatures that share our planet. Love of the outdoors and of a variety of outdoor sports. Driven to learn and expand my own consciousness and understanding through curiosity and love of life. Creative skills merge with analytical ones, leading to an interest in a myriad of topics; ranging from politics, economics, science to environmental. Motivated to use my art, music and writing to support and educate people towards humane practices that support and respect all of life, including practices supporting a healthy planet.

2 Responses to The Spark of the Arab Uprise

  1. hiwaar says:

    Thank you for the useful contnt and for the analysis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: