Nature’s Response to Humanity’s Destruction of Nature | > EIDs Coronavirus | Planetary Health

Coronavirus: ‘Nature is sending us a message’, says UN environment chief.

 

Real Life This coronavirus is the wake-up call for a complacent civilisation.

By George Monbiot, published in the Guardian 25th March 2020

Human destruction of nature ,

‘Tip of the iceberg’: is our destruction of nature “responsible for Covid-19?

Humanity’s destruction of biodiversity creates the conditions for new diseases such as Covid-19, the viral epidemic that emerged in China in December 2019, and within months became a global pandemic.

Coronavirus, a new EID, Emerging Infectious Disease arises. Sparked at a ‘wet-market’ in China, which abound in Asia and Africa, where humans bring in live and dead wildlife (frequently endangered species) to sell for human consumption. The animals they introduce for slaughter are from diverse environments, crowded together, which is unhealthy as it is, but a recipe for disaster when their proximity to humans introduce viruses for which humans do not have immunities. No doubt the stresses and horror these animals feel as they are trapped, handled roughly and packed into these places, weakens their own immune systems.

For the animals, wet markets are hell on earth. Thousands of sentient, palpitating beings endure hours of suffering and anguish before being brutally butchered. This is just one small part of the suffering that humans systematically inflict on animals in every country – in factory farms, laboratories, and the entertainment industry.“

The combination of animal trade and the fact that the human population continues to encroach more and more on animal habitats, leads to human communities being more at risk. They have closer contact to animals for whom the viruses are not harmful whatsoever, yet lethal to humans.

The microbes, the animals and us, mondediplio, monde diplomatique, EID, Accelerating habitat loss behind Covid-19

Accelerating habitat loss behind Covid-19

The fact that the human population is increasing exponentially, demanding more and more energy and housing, leads to this perpetual invasion of the habitats of other species and destruction of the natural world around us. Humans have been massively disrupting ecosystems worldwide. Humans are not merely damaging the balance of biodiversity, but precipitating a “biological annihilation” of species, a planetary 6th Mass Extinction. As scientists such as the physicist and deep ecologist Fritjof Capra, become more cognizant of the interdependent nature of living systems, they recognize how critical it is to maintain healthy ecosystems everywhere. The discipline “Planetary health“ has emerged to educate and guide people towards sustainable practices. It focuses on “the sustainability of our civilization and the toll of inequitable, inefficient and unsustainable resource consumption on the planet and human health. In addition to public health and environmental health considerations, it examines upstream political, economic, and social systems and calls for an interdisciplinary approach.”

“Planetary Health characterizes the human health impacts of human-caused disruptions of Earth’s natural systems.”

In the meantime, EID’s such as SARS, MERS, AIDS, EBOLA, CORONa-19 will continue to be introduced to the human population, because of how disruptive humans are to the habitats of other creatures on the planet. Obviously, certain populations such as Buddhist and Indigenous people have not had this disregard for other ‘Earthlings’. However, the Western world for centuries, has been objectifying the natural world and assigning a monetary value to an area or entity, rather than recognizing its worth, in itself, alive and healthy. By disassociating value and having no compassion or respect for the living systems on the planet, mankind has carved a reputation as the most vicious predator.

All other creatures and territories on the planet are ‘fair game’, to do with as we please, often perpetuating rituals that have been in place in various cultures for many generations. It’s hard enough for an individual to change habits. To question or abandon traditions that have been ingrained in a culture for centuries, seems excruciatingly difficult. Yet now, most of us on the planet are being quarantined and enforced into ‘social distancing’. Routines of work, study and social gathering in the proximity of others, stopped.

This Cartesian, mechanistic and reductionist view which has dominated, is what has ushered in the Anthropocene epoch, in which humans dominate the planet, and have excessively changed it.

We embrace our technologies for transport and construction, in the age of perpetual development. Most of our time is dominated with how to ‘make’ money, as the end-all goal. The motto is that money will provide freedom. Car advertisements seduce us with the association that ownership of a slick automobile will lure the mate and guarantee glamorous getaways in rugged nature. Yet for the last decades, even with automation, people are working longer hours (if at all) and have even less time for leisure. I noticed decades ago at university, that students were already more consumed with choosing a major in a ‘field’ more likely to ensure a lucrative career, and abominably less interested in learning, for itself. Even education is commodified.

In the age of consumerism, plots of land, forested woods, rivers and fields, creatures of the land and water, are regarded as something that we use for resources and organize our slaughter rituals around. Back when the population of the earth was not increasing at an exponential rate, it seemed to be ‘fair game’ to seasonally slaughter whales, buffalo, dolphins, elephants, rhinoceroses, wildcats and now pangolins, as fast as we could. These rituals continue, and the open seas and savannas seem to be lawless, where large industrial scale operations of fishing (with huge nets of by-catch and ruthless scraping of the ocean floor) as well as organized crime involved in utilizing helicopters to kill wild game, are rampant.

What is incomprehensible, is that as humans have learned how intelligent and fascinating various different species are; such as bird intelligence, empathy in elephants, the intricacy, intelligence and fascination of the octopus…we nevertheless continue to poach, slaughter, harvest and eat them.

Humans have so prodigiously crafted and heralded their technological prowess, yet act towards one another and towards the earth and its creatures with such ruthless violence; something to control, abuse and conquer. With more time on my hands now that every activity involving a gathering of people has benefited  cancelled, I was exposed this article by Charmers on “Dismantling Empire”, contributed to Tom Dispatch. He speaks about American excessive militarism, and citizens having an 800 pound Gorilla in the room, in reference to the literally 800 military bases the USA has throughout the world. If all were released and abdicated, it would provide Trillions of dollars. What I had not realized as a fan of the personality of Barack Obama, and perhaps didn’t want to know, is that as he made strides in protecting environmental policies, he also full-out sustained and strengthened the military budget, which sort of defeats the other efforts.

Presently, the increase in fascist leaders populating the globe, pray on peoples’ fear of the ‘other’, refugees arriving at their doorsteps from far away. Most of whom are forced to leave their homelands, having no choice. They have been affected by the warming globe which has caused droughts, failed crops, fires and floods. Besides the massive destruction of the natural world through various dirty industries, it is predominantly the USA, followed by other wealthy countries of the Global North, who precipitated climate change. Ironically, instead of acknowledging our role in global heating due to the energy consumption habits of the western world, rather than organizing around circumventing the actions that destabilize planetary systems further and dramatically accelerating actions to prescribe, implement and enforce sweeping social changes (as is being instituted at this present time of the coronavirus pandemic, these leaders are instead castigating the refugees and further investing in deals to create jobs, enrich some, while spoiling places without the slightest consideration of the repercussions to the species living there. The Amazon rainforest for Bolsonaro is fair game. Propping up negligent industries involving petroleum and plastics is fair game. The Western obsession with material consumption, as a right of passage and display of one’s worth in society, seems to be endlessly packaged into slick advertising and the Hollywood illusion that perpetuates it.

Yuval Noah Harari, history, Homo sapiens, cooperation, storytellers, finance fiction

Historian Yuval Noah Harari points out that the reason human beings today dominate the world as they do, is because of our capacity to believe in fictions and share the same stories. He talks of bankers as being very successful story tellers.

In response to the billionaire Mark Benioff’s op ed stating that the current system of capitalism has lead to horrifying inequalities, Anand Giridharadas, author of “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World,” tweeted Monday, “…I don’t trust business to behave better voluntarily, any more than I trust cats with mice care,” adding that he supports raising taxes on the wealthy. “The best way to get business to behave better is to drastically reduce business’s power,” Giridharadas tweeted.

Naomi Klein points out that now is the time that we can push forward what might have been considered radical ideas just a few weeks ago. At the time of shock among populations, is prime breeding ground for disaster capitalism. When people are distracted and off balance, the economic elite can slide in new game plans: heighten security, bail out banks and the dirtiest industries and ignore any wrong doing or unethical practices of the large institutions in which they have holdings. Wars have been big money makers among particular private firms. Various US Senators just sold their stock options days before the market crashed, while President Trump minimized the risks of the virus. He then assigned not a medical doctor or infectious disease specialist in charge of organizing the country’s health response to this pandemic, but his political VP in charge.

As people are suddenly forced to stay home, businesses close, paychecks not received, it is perhaps time for people to realize that a stimulus of $1,200 for each household, is like throwing coins or loaves of plastic-wrapped white bread on the streets, and cases of plastic water bottles. When in the same paragraph it’s mentioned that airlines, oil and gas industries and cruise ships, automobile – all fueling economic and health atrocities, will be bailed out. The economic gap pivoted to be deeper. The very industries that are tearing up the earth, for our consumption, are deemed to continue. Humans have continued to focus on maximizing their profits and buying and building and thinking that it’s fair game. We continue to chase the dollar, regardless of what is destroyed in the process.

Is this not a tipping point? With the recent spike in the ‘Billionaires club’ in the last decades, this imbalance also beckons change
The virus is the earth’s response to having her lungs and tissues choked, poisoned and burned and creatures assaulted, imprisoned, abused and put in misery.

The cosmos, our earth system, is letting us know that we need to re-assess what is fair game. And stop treating all of life – a tree, a bush, grasses, rivers and streams, plants and animals – as something disposable that we can do with as we please. Iit would be very unpleasant to live in a convenient, paved world with a Walmart, other cheap franchises populating every corner, while deforesting and paving every patch of nature.

With this economic premise of the primacy of profit, humans as well as all of the natural world are redundant and disposable. Gone are opportunities of individual craftsmanship and artistry, to create vocations through love, devotion to expertise and caring to protect the earth. With the acceptance of the ‘merger and acquisitions’ mentality as fair game, all individual enterprise is completely shoved out of competition.

No, this system of slavery to the economic elite who have cameras and security and sooner than later, computer chips inserted under your skin, so that at a gesture of a click, they could wipe out all of the undesirables >>> all who are not them, tucked away, insulated and isolated in their glass cages.

The coronavirus is a climactic act of the cosmic laws of nature, to suspend the catastrophic destruction of humanity, for which, Morelli states, we obviously have an excessive debt.

Reflections on the Coronavirus by Raffaele Morelli, an Italian psychiatrist and psychotherapist’s insight. I was touched by his message, translated it. The French version is below.

A Reflection on the Coronavirus by Raffaele Morelli Italian psychiatrist and psychotherapist:

“I believe that the laws of the cosmos have their way of establishing an equilibrium, rebalancing, when things becomes upset. The times that we are living, full of anomalies and paradoxes, makes us think …

In this phase where climate change, caused by environmental disasters, has reached worrying levels. First China, then so many other countries, are building blockades; the economy is falling apart,
but pollution is decreasing considerably.
The air is improving; we use a mask, but we breathe.

In a historic moment when, all over the world, reactive ideologies and discriminatory policies strongly recall our brutal history, a virus arrives, which makes us realize that, in an instant, we can also become the discriminated, the segregated, those who are blocked at the border, who bring disease.

Even if we have nothing to do with it. Even if we are white, western and travel first class.(power complex).

In a society based on productivity and consumption, in which we run 14 hours a day without really knowing why, without Saturdays nor Sundays,
without much pause on our schedules, suddenly, the – STOP – arrives.

All stationary, must remain at home for days and days.
To count the time whose value we have lost
as soon as it is no longer measurable
in money, in profit.
If one only knew what to do?

In a period when the education of our own children, by force of circumstance, is often
delegated to various figures and institutions, the virus closes schools and forces us to find alternative solutions to reunite mothers and fathers with their own children.
It forces us to re-create the “family”.

In a dimension where relationships, communication, socializing are essentially played out in this virtual non-space of social networks giving us the illusion of proximity,
the virus takes away our closeness,
that which is truly real: no one should touch each other,
no kissing, no hugging
maintain a distance, the coldness of non-contact.
How long have we taken these gestures and their significance for granted?

In a social climate where thinking about yourself has become the rule,
the virus sends us a clear message:
the only way out of it is reciprocity, a sense of belonging, community
to feel part of something bigger.
so it’s necessary to take care
and who can take care of us.

Shared responsibility, feeling that our actions depend,
not just on our own fate.
but the destinies of others, of all those around us.
And that we depend on them.

So, if we stop the “witch hunt”, to ask ourselves who is at fault, and why it all happened, rather ask ourselves what we can learn. I think we all have a lot to think about and actions to take.
Because with the cosmos and its laws, obviously, we have an excessive debt.
Reminding us of it with a high price, with a virus.”

-.-.-.—.-

Une Reflexion sur le Coronavirus par Raffaele Morelli psychiatre et psychothérepeut italien:

“Je crois que le cosmos a ca façon de rééquilibrer les choses est ses lois, quand celles-ci viennent á être trop bouleversées.
Le moment que nous vivons, plein d’anomalies et de paradoxes, fair réfléchir…

Dans une phase où le changement climatique, causé par les désastres environnementaux, a
atteint des niveaux inquiėtants.
D’abbord la chine, puis tant d’autres pays, sont en constrants au blocage; l’économie s’écroule,
mais la pollution diminue de manière considérable.
L’air s’améliore; on utilise un masque, mais on respire.

Dans un moment historique où, partout dans le monde, she réactivent certains idéologies et
politiques discriminatoires rappelant avec force un passé mesquin, un virus arrive, qui nous fait
expérimenter que, en un instant, nous povons aussi nous devenir les discriminés, les
ségrégués, ceux qu’on bloquent aix frontiéres, qui amènent les maladies.
Même si nous n’y sommes pour rien.
Même is nous sont blancs, occidentaux et que nous voyageons en première classe.
(complexe de toute puissance).

Dans une société fondée sur la productivité et la consommation, dans laquelle nous courons
tous 14 heures par jour après on ne sais pas bien porquoi, sans samede ni dimanche,
sans plus de pause sur le calandrier, tout á coup, le – STOP – arrive.
Tous à l’arrêt, á la maison, pendant des jours et des jours.
Á faire le compte d’un temps dont nous avons perdu la valeur.
dès qu’ill n’est plus mesurable
en argent, en profit.
Sait-en seulement encore quoi en faire?

Dans une période où l’éducation de nos propres enfants, par la force des choses, et souvent
déléguée á des figures et institutions diverses, le virus fermes les écoles et nous oblige á trouver
des solutions alternative á réunir les mamans et les papas avec votres propres enfants.
I’ll nous obliger á refaire une “famille”.

Dans une dimension où les rélations, la communication, la sociabilité se jouent essentiellement
dans ce non-espace du virtuel des résaux sociaux nous donnant l’illusion de la proximité,
le virus nous enlève la proximité,
celles qui et bien reréelle: personne ne doit se toucher,
pas de baisers, pas d’embrassades
de la distance, de le froid du non-contact.
Depuis quand avons-nous pris pour acquis ces gestes et leur significance?

Dans un climat sociale où penser à soi est devenu la régle,
le virus nous envoie un message clair:
la seule manière de nous en sortir, c’est la réciprocité, le sens de l’appartenance, la communauté
se sentir faire partie de quelque chose la plus grand.
donc il faux prendre soin
et qui peut prendre soin de nous.

La responsabilité partagée, sentir que de nos actions dépendent,
non pas seulement propres sort.
mais des sorts des autres, de tous ceux qui nous entourent.
Et que nous dépendons d’eux.

Alors, si nous arrêtons la “chasse aux sorciéres”, de nous demander à qui la faute, et pourquoi tout ça est arrivé, pour nous interroget plutôt sur ce que nous pouvons apprendre, je crois que nous avon’s tous beaucoup de matiére á réflexion et á agir.
Parce qu’avec le cosmos et ses lois,de manière évidente, nous avons une dette excesive.
Il nous le rapelle aux prix fort, avec une virus.”

Storytelling and Stories-Not-Sold in The Politics of Economics | Systems Theory | Social Commons | Happy Planet Index | feat: Rife, Harari, Capra, McKenna, Brewer, Monbiot

The recent mass shooting in Las Vegas lead me to pursue the alternative press because of various allegations that the mainstream media had a completely different reportage than what had been disclosed from other sources. Once I extracted myself from this subject and came up for air, the winding alt digital path lead me to information I certainly hadn’t heard about in any text books.

By entering into alternative media, we are introduced to information that not surprisingly, is quite different from what the main cultural avenues of information have surmised our history to be. Fortunately, we can see clearly how the various sectors of culture play out – from history books, to learning institutions, to government organizations – when only a few are privy to what stories are told. I mention stories-are-sold, because it comes down to economic censorship. The understanding of a needed systems approach to observing all things, is an emergence of the recognition of what is lacking in a one-sided, atomized, mechanistic and hierarchical view of life; from within which our current cultural myths have developed. And as we embrace the realization that all of life is a shared network, upon which humans have arbitrarily exercised domain by collectively believing in our fictional stories, the concept of a commons – of an intellectual and natural resources heritage shared by all – we will have more of a commitment to protect that which is rightfully ours, and to want to extend and share our abundance and happiness, outside of the domain of pure economics. As this balance shifts, we will see the earth and its inhabitants not as a commodity to be used, but as a paradise to love and protect. And as this moves towards a celebration of autonomy while building on the shared intellectual and spiritual network, we will evolve a new way of valuing all life, information, invention, our selves and our communication and motions on this planet.

Did you know that there was a proven cure for cancer, in the 1930’s? And that news of the man whose discoveries and experiments, which were lauded at the time, fell into silence, suppressed by the politics of economics, or the economics of politics? His name, Dr. Royal Rife was suspended from the history books, just as that of Nikola Tesla, a contemporary of Einstein, whose fantastic inventions and successful discoveries were inconvenient for the narrative of the time.

Royal Rife’s genius was the creation of a multi-faceted (thousands of parts) 200 pound microscope design. He was able to observe intercellular activity for the first time, rivaling current technology, with the exception that his microscopes were able to view live material. “Electron microscopes made today are capable of distinguishing even individual atoms, yet they can not be used to image living cells because the process of viewing with electrons, destroy the samples.”

Royal Raymond Rife was specifically focused on the fact that all life vibrates. He proceeded to do thousands of experiments with the optical microscopes he designed; observing, identifying and testing the resonances of pathogens of different organisms with varying frequencies. His aim was to find the corresponding vibration that would single out a specific pathogen, to eradicate it.

Dr. Royal Rife's Beam Ray Machine

Dr. Royal Rife’s Beam Ray Machine

His experiments in the 1930’s lead him to creating the ‘Beam Ray’, which was proven to effectively eradicate cancer and to cure people of a host of different diseases. He measured and utilized specific frequencies to attack specific pathogens through finding the appropriate resonance. “Rife claimed to have discovered the frequencies which destroyed herpes, polio, spinal meningitis, tetanus, influenza, and many other dangerous, disease-causing organisms. His high success rates with different types of cancer were what particularly brought him a great deal of attention and notoriety. Rife used different optical vibrations which he revealed were able to disintegrate specific pathogens, leaving all other activity within the cell unaltered. There were over 50 infectious diseases that he apparently discovered cures for.”

“The ‘Rife machine’ is an electronic device which emits audio and/or radio waves applied to an individual with the intent of bettering the individual’s health. By finding the proper resonance, Rife was able to shatter the virus, just as a singer can use it to break a wine glass. This is why he called it the Mortal Oscillatory Rate.”

vibration

vibration

It works on the principle of sympathetic vibration and resonance, which states that if there are two similar objects and one of them is vibrating, the other will begin to vibrate as well, even if they are not touching. Seems like people as a group could coordinate their efforts and tackle quite tremendous enterprises! It has been proven that people who meditate in unison, and focus their attention together in coherence, produces a distinctly stronger result than if they act independently.

Here’s a video describing Rife’s work and challenges.

Royal Rife musician, inventor, doctor used frequencies in his microscope to detect and disintegrate, cancer, pathogens

Royal Rife musician, inventor, doctor used frequencies in his microscope to detect and disintegrate cancer and other pathogens

Rife’s work was more or less erased from our modern day awareness, due to the influence of one man in particular, who had come to lead the American Medical Association (founded in 1847), Dr. Morris Fishbein. Fishbein had ulterior motives. Morris Fishbein began running the AMA in 1924, and by 1934 owned all the stock in the company. He used his authoritative position as director of the AMA to crush competition and choose what medical approaches would be funded or whether they would even be acknowledged. Initially, he tried to buy out Rife’s machine and when Rife refused to sell his plans, Fishbein proceeded to destroy his work and then his reputation, stealing his records and physically destroying his machines. He used his position of power to dissolve and eradicate Rife from history, just as Rife has used resonances to eradicate cancer.

History, as the word describes, is a story. And the angle of the story, how the information is conveyed and whether or not it is conveyed, depends on who is telling it.

There was another man with hundreds of inventions whose genius would be purged from history until his name emerged again a century later, Nikola Tesla. Edison’s (DC) direct current rivaled Tesla’s (AC) alternating current. Tesla was a fantastic and copious inventor. Notably, his Tesla coil was able to capture and transmit energy with very basic instruments, capturing it for free, from within the electromagnetic field which permeates the entire planet. Tesla recognized that the space around us, everywhere, is not a vacuum, but filled with energy. However, his inexpensive tools to extract and conduct energy were wiped from the slate of possibility, by those who envisioned establishing a monopoly on generating power. They didn’t want free or inexpensively acquired power, they wanted to charge the public. Similarly, Rife’s machine not only was a demonstrable cure for cancer, but an inexpensive device in which patients needed only stand near the machine for several minutes, every few days. They merely needed to have the frequencies of waves wash over their bodies in a non-invasive and non-toxic manner.

By preventing these inventions from reaching media or scientific evaluation, they were effectively obliterated from public awareness, merely by the dictates of a few people. The art of withholding the story, annihilated competition and allowed their profits to flow.

A little bit later I reference Andreas Weber, a biologist who states

“Nothing is more open-source than DNA.”

Joe Brewer recently wrote this article Why Are Universities Failing Humanity? “This is a time of extreme urgency and need, yet almost no major institution on Earth is mobilizing its capacities to address the scale of our predicaments.” Brewer determined through his years of research that in fact not only is the modern approach to studying information too segmented, with each of the avenues of research partitioned from the others, but what information is made available has to do with funding and who is to gain from distributing this information. “The situation is complicated further by the ways that funding mechanisms like the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health in the United States (and their analogues in other countries) set agendas for which topics will get financial support.” Brewer talks of the ‘disciplinary silos’ that create funnels for learning, teaching, research. Funding or lack of it, have created barriers to integration across domains of knowledge, which impede the convergence of information and awareness necessary to perceive a crises on a global scale.”

The biophysicist Mae-Wan Ho known for her critical views on genetic engineering and evolution, wrote a book called “The Rainbow and the Worm The Physics of Organisms”. She similarly points to the problem of the reductionist, mechanistic standards of science, that overshadow and subjugate knowledge, so that one is only seeing part of the picture. Ho claims that analytical reductionism doesn’t see things in terms of their coherent relationship. One has to look at the whole system; including the biology, physiology, chemistry, physics and mathematics. Brewer agrees, an interdisciplinary systems approach, is what is missing.

In his article, Brewer writes that “Scholars and researchers who seek to address systemic issues at universities must paddle against huge organizational currents, as is well known by anyone seeking to be both an academic and a transdisciplinary researcher. We need to stop selecting students, faculty, and grant proposals within disciplinary boundaries and start framing problems at systemic levels around which coordination is found to be needed for adequately addressing them. This means funding agencies need to be reorganized around systemic issues. Ecological disharmony and extreme inequality have already been named as two high-profile opportunities yet to be capitalized upon; dealing with exponential technological change would be another.”

The path of science and the means of instituting information and knowledge in the Western World for the last several hundred years has been one which separates, defines and isolates one discipline from another. From this one-sided approach is emerging the recognition of a completely different model other than the linear one, that of systems theory.

The book that the physicist Fritjof Capra and biologist Pier Luigi Luisi recently published after years of research, The Systems View of Life A Unifying Vision, echoes the recognition of the need for a holistic manner of viewing life and the world. Their awareness of the clear inadequacies of the standard, linear, prevailing scientific approach steered them to actually create the alternative that was loudly making itself clear.

Capra and Luisi see a systemic conception of life emerging at the forefront of science. “New emphasis has been given to complexity, networks, and patterns of organization, leading to a novel kind of ‘systemic’ thinking.” What they realize is that everything unto itself is a perfectly functioning and self-healing entity, which works cohesively and is integrally a part of the whole fabric with which it interacts and cooperates.

“The Systems Theory defines life of all kinds, as not a distinct entity which can merely be quantitatively measured and classified into a particular domain, but that the very essence of life is a qualitative interconnected network of relationships, an ecological system of relationships between different species.”

I wrote about this upon discovering their work in a former blog https://digesthis.wordpress.com/2016/01/26/the-new-story-sustainability-fritjof-capra-pier-luigi-luisis-systemic-view-cel/

Rather than isolating disciplines, or organisms, or parts of a cell into singular events, recognize that all of these are part of a vibrant network and must be regarded and studied within this context. Similarly, in education, interdisciplinary approaches to complex situations, is a natural emergence of understanding networked relationships. We’ve had plenty of situations within our culture that reveal deliberate blockage of information, to benefit a few. In fact, culture becomes more sophisticated as the insights, observations, understanding and inventions are shared by all, not privatized and turned into commodities. Cities are like neurosynaptic centers, where concentrations of information come together, leading to inventions and exchanges, new levels of understanding. Which will lead to the point of the Commons.

The Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari in his TED talk, clearly illustrates that human ‘history’ is profoundly and dynamically shaped by the stories that people tell. He mentions that biologically, humans are not terribly different from other species, from fungus to frogs, to chimpanzees. What sets us apart and has allowed homo sapiens to lunge ahead of all other life forms to essentially dominate the planet, is due to our capacity to flexibly cooperate with one another, over large networks. And our capacity to work together is due to our creativity and use of our imagination.

Whatever one imagines, can be created.

Harari states that humans have a dual reality; “They live in an objective reality, but over the centuries have constructed on top of this a second layer of fictional reality; made of fictional entities; like nations, gods, money, corporations. As history unfolded, this fictional reality became more and more powerful. Today, the most powerful forces in the world are these fictional entities.”

George Monbiot has written very often about the challenges of maintaining healthy ecosystems because of the political and economic climate that continually supports large industries (animal, petroleum, agriculture) which disseminate wildlife habitats, destroy environments and lead to more monoculture. http://www.monbiot.com/2017/09/11/how-do-we-get-out-of-this-mess/ In this Monbiot states, “Stories are the means by which we navigate the world. They allow us to interpret its complex and contradictory signals. We all possess a narrative instinct: an innate disposition to listen for an account of who we are and where we stand….Those who tell the stories run the world.

The very survival of rivers and trees, lions and elephants, depends on the decisions and wishes of these fictional entities; like the United States, like Google, like the World Bank, like Palm Oil corporations. Quite brilliantly, Harari says that

“the master storytellers are the big bankers, the finance ministers, the prime ministers.”

“The Burning Paradise: Palm Oil in the Land of the Tree Kangaroo” reveals,
What happened when a giant Korean conglomerate set its eyes on Indonesia’s largest intact rainforest.”

Tree Kangaroos and Birds of Paradise in Papua Losing their habitat to Palm Oil Clearcutting

Tree Kangaroos and Birds of Paradise in Papua Losing their habitat to Palm Oil Clearcutting

Government leaders, finance ministers and corporate executives tell us a very convincing story. And if everyone believes this story, it actually works. Pharmaceutical companies are very slick in their delivery of advertising, with many tentacles in the air waves and a plethora of TV commercials, now surpassing those of the automobile industry. Yet in the case of petroleum corporations, animal or agricultural industries, lumber, palm oil…there’s a distance, and the work that they do is only really witnessed by people whose property is near to the dirty and consuming practices. In the case of Palm Oil companies dismantling and burning up the virgin Rain Forest, very few of us have an inkling of what is really happening in these remote areas, except for through organizations who do the scouting, who trek there, take aerial footage and who risk their lives, in some cases, to get close enough. I rely on the Guardian for example, and more and more alternative press. Like The UTNE READER Propagandopoly: Monopoly as an Ideological Tool and Mongabay, Korean palm oil firm burned large tracts of forestland in Indonesia, NGOs allege and since being informed about the English version of this paper, Le Monde Diplomatique “The century of revolution”

Noam Chomsky stated years ago the concept of Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media. These fictional realities generate power because of the fact that they are collectively believed and adhered to.

Yuval Noah Harari brilliantly states that “money is the most successful story ever invented and told by humans; it is the only story everybody believes.”

The ecologist Suzanne Simard discerns through her studies that trees communicate with one another regularly and over vast distances. In Simard’s Ted Talk “How Trees Talk to Each Other, she points out that trees are not competitive, but in fact are super cooperators.

Harari points out that stories that we’ve invented and spread around aren’t necessarily ones that are good for the collective species. “States and Nations are not objective reality, same is true of the economic field. The most important actors in the global economy presently are companies which are legal fictions. Corporations mostly want to make money. And our capitalist system is one built on growth as measured by the Gross Domestic Product. Unfortunately, this hasn’t been the healthiest manner of cooperation with the ecosystem of the earth.

Terence Mckenna relates in his talk A Species Addicted

“There is no serious plan to deal with what havoc humans have created with the planet, nature, the other creatures, the diminishing rain forests. Through the propaganda and lies created by our most powerful storytellers, the human race, in an ego-driven manner, is following a culture which is a lie.”

Caitlin Johnstone echoes in her article about feminism in our current political environment, is that the patriarchal history was written by men. “Money is the engine room of the patriarchy. Humans have indeed used our superior neurology to out-survive and out-thrive all other competing organisms, but then we’ve also continued to use it to conquer, kill, exploit and enslave one another throughout the entirety of recorded history, and to decimate the ecosystem which we need to survive. If we end up going extinct due to anthropogenic climate chaos or nuclear armageddon, we will have failed as spectacularly as a species can possibly fail in the extremely short time that we have been here.”

Johnstone says in her article “It Is Evolve Or Die Time” “What few problems we encounter which aren’t man-made (natural disasters, some diseases) could be vastly minimized if our species was pouring all its mental energy and creativity into creating a better world for everyone instead of into economic competition and warfare.”

The journalist Chris Hedges in an interview following his publication in Truthdig September 17, titled The Silencing of Dissent, mentions that the same one-way story embraces media and politics, stemming from the forces of corporate capitalism and proponents of American imperialism. “The utopian ideology of neoliberalism and the primacy of corporate power have branded themselves into the human consciousness as inevitable forms of human progress. And those who have had the say, due to their positions and power, have imposed de facto censorship to shut out critics of unfettered capitalism and imperialism, such as Noam Chomsky or Howard Zinn. This has rippled from politics, into the media and our learning institutions, as well as government agencies such as the American Medical Association, American Diabetes Association and American Institute of Health.”

“Do not significantly alienate those upon whom we depend for money and access!”

In the interview Hedges states, “Those who rise in the organization and hold power are consummate careerists. Their loyalty is to their advancement and the stature and profitability of the institution. With the bankruptcy of the ruling ideology, and the bankruptcy of the American liberal class and the American left, those who hold fast to intellectual depth and an examination of systems of power, including economics, culture and politics, have to be silenced.”

In a former blog I wrote WTF | “What the Health” documentary: America’s Medical Societies Driven by Corpocrisy | More Inconvenient Truths | Culinary Medicine | Farmacy I was describing the What The Health documentary film that uncovered excellent realizations about ‘standard procedure’ covert operations in funding and information withheld. This film is about the collusion of industries in their misinformation to the public about diet and health.

Same theme: information withheld, mis-information provided, which the film makers uncovered as they approached various American government health organizations, who toe-the-line of their sponsors. Therefore, instead of speaking the truth about diet and health, they withhold it. You can watch it here. The industries which use the land’s resources precipitously, wastefully and inefficiently to maintain the beef, pork and dairy industries, are in fact the same industries who paid off these large institutions who claim to be representing facts to provide the public with information about health. Therefore since their sponsors are the very same industries who operate food industries that are unhealthy, the various organizations maintain a deceptive policy.

Terence Mckenna mentions that ironically regardless of the wealth and GDP of the USA, the level of unhappiness is immense, there’s an utterly unhappy ruling class. Yet what has begun to emerge along with the awareness of the need for cooperation and diversification, is that certainly the dictates of capitalism and consumerism are not what bring health, happiness or progress, but are about continued growth for the purposes of profit, without regard to the entire health of the system. Mae-Wan Ho describes in The Communicative and Integrative Biology of her book concept The Rainbow and the Worm, that “life is essentially quantum coherent systems, based primarily on the degree to which the various parts of organisms are able to work autonomously but still remain highly coordinated.” She mentions that going against the grain of the established story, all lead to problems; such as lack of courage in addressing the big questions or to disagree with the mainstream, lack of imagination, lack of funding, too much concentration on molecular nuts and bolts, domination of reductionist biology, too much specialization and lack of interdisciplinary training, lack of appreciation of the beauty of nature. In my opinion, to really understand nature, one needs to be both a romantic poet and artist at heart.”

In George Monbiot’s article in the Guardian, Common Wealth, he asserts that two critical factions are missing in the standard assumption that the two main actors in the economy are the State and the Market. “In fact there are four major economic sectors: the market, the state, the household and the commons.” The household is almost entirely comprised of the work of women. Both market and state receive a massive subsidy from the household: the unpaid labour of parents and other carers, still provided mostly by women. If children were not looked after, fed, taught basic skills at home and taken to school, there would be no economy. And if people who are ill, elderly or have disabilities were not helped and supported by others, the public care bill would break the state. What is critically misconceived, is the concept of the commonwealth.

The vast wealth of the economic elite has accumulated at the expense of the populace, through their seizure of the fourth sector of the economy: the commons.

A commons is neither state nor market. It has three main elements. First a resource, such as land, water, minerals, scientific research, hardware or software. Second, a community of people who have shared and equal rights to this resource, and organise themselves to manage it. Third, the rules, systems and negotiations they develop to sustain it and allocate the benefits.

A true commons is managed not for the accumulation of capital or profit, but for the steady production of prosperity or wellbeing. The commons have been attacked by both state power and capitalism for centuries.

Resources that no one invented or created, or that a large number of people created together, (or in several cases where inventions have been submerged from collective consciousness by being dismissed or disregarded by the powers to censor them at the time), are stolen by those who sniff an opportunity for profit.

Monbiot states that “Enclosure creates inequality. It produces a rentier economy: those who have captured essential resources force everyone else to pay for access. It shatters communities and alienates people from their labour and their surroundings. The ecosystems commoners sustained are liquidated for cash. Inequality, rent, atomisation, alienation, environmental destruction: the loss of the commons has caused or exacerbated many of the afflictions of our age. A commons, unlike state spending, obliges people to work together, to sustain their resources and decide how the income should be used. It gives community life a clear focus. It depends on democracy in its truest form. It destroys inequality. It provides an incentive to protect the living world. It creates, in sum, a Politics of Belonging.”

The German biologist, philosopher and nature writer Andreas Weber recognizes the interconnectedness of humans to nature. In his talk at the conference on “Economics and the Common(s): From Seed Form to Core Paradigm” Weber mentions that though we can maintain aspects of our modus operandi of the age of enlightenment, we need to make a paradigm shift to enlivenment; seeing all life in continuous interrelationship. “In our question of “what is life?”, we need to look beneath the ‘operating system’ engendered by the enlightenment in which things, life, humans are measured according to efficiency, competition and egoistical agents. This approach is cutting things down into blocks, separate parts, into arbitrary entities and dead objects. What is missing is that there are no feelings involved.”

He claims, “we need a new bios, enlivenment; stressing the expressive and experiential qualities of being alive. Instead of looking at nature and life in a causal way, when we see things as they are, they are constantly changing, in an unfolding process of freedom, autonomy and value. Every commons is a material and knowledge commons.”

 

Nothing is more open-source than DNA.

 

“The economy of the commons is naturally anti-capitalist. From within a cell to a whole organism, all life is in compartments with its own boundary. However it’s not a wall, but a permeable boundary, in which the inhabitants are continuously interrelating and crystalizing into a whole, a unity. Quantum physics demonstrates that we affect the outcome of the experiment by observing. When we’re talking about the biosphere, ecology, economy, we are always talking about ourselves. The new ism, enlivenment, stresses that we need to recognize and incorporate the fact that we are feeling beings, with living experiences, who wish to feel meaning.”

The Venus Project is about a Resource-Based Economy – All Resources are a Common Heritage.

Venus Project Resource-Based Economy - All Resources are a Common Heritage

Venus Project Resource-Based Economy – All Resources are a Common Heritage

The Venus Project – a Resource-Based Economy Blueprint for the genesis of a new world civilization.

This functioning, healthy system that has already been operating in Costa Rica, which Jason Hickel describes in “Want to avert the apocalypse? Take lessons from Costa Rica

Hickel points out, “If we want to have any hope of averting catastrophe, we’re going to have to do something about our addiction to growth. This is tricky, because GDP growth is the main policy objective of virtually every government on the planet. It lies at the heart of everything we’ve been told to believe about how the economy should work: that GDP growth is good, that it’s essential to progress. Costa Rica proves that achieving high levels of human wellbeing has very little to do with GDP and almost everything to do with something very different.

Redistribution can be a substitute for growth

Every few years the New Economics Foundation publishes the Happy Planet Indexa measure of progress that looks at life expectancy, wellbeing and equality rather than the narrow metric of GDP, and plots these measures against ecological impact.

Those factors which contribute to health and happiness do not go together with uninhibited growth of the Gross Domestic Product.

The Happy Planet Index measures what matters: sustainable wellbeing for all.

“In this sense, Costa Rica is the most efficient economy on earth: it produces high standards of living with low GDP and minimal pressure on the environment.

Costa Rica is a thorn in the side of orthodox economics. In fact, the part of Costa Rica where people live the longest, happiest lives – the Nicoya Peninsula – is also the poorest, in terms of GDP per capita. Researchers have concluded that Nicoyans do so well not in spite of their “poverty”, but because of it – because their communities, environment and relationships haven’t been ploughed over by industrial expansion. A series of progressive governments started rolling out healthcare, education and social security in the 1940s and expanded these to the whole population from the 50s onward, after abolishing the military and freeing up more resources for social spending. Costa Rica is one of only a few countries in the global south that enjoys robust universalism.”

Happy Planet Index is not about GDP but lower economic footprint

Happy Planet Index is not about GDP but lower economic footprint

According to their homepage “Wealthy Western countries, often seen as the standard of success, do not rank highly on the Happy Planet Index. Instead, several countries in Latin America and the Asia Pacific region lead the way by achieving high life expectancy and wellbeing with much smaller Ecological Footprints. Costa Rica tops the list of countries every time. With a life expectancy of 79.1 years and levels of wellbeing in the top 7% of the world, Costa Rica matches many Scandinavian nations in these areas and neatly outperforms the United States. And it manages all of this with a GDP per capita of only $10,000 (£7,640), less than one fifth that of the US.”

To recognize that all land, ocean, soil, trees, air and plants that we have not created but are part of the earth, which sustains us, is our home to protect. To shift our activities to maintain these benefits and resources; caring, maintaining, learning and providing to equally distribute to all, making this commons something we integrally work towards nurturing and protecting. And the more we advance in education and awareness towards constructing inventions that are the least toxic and most energy efficient, is something that we can all participate in with pride. The stories we tell, can lead us to a very happy and harmonious planet.

Terence McKenna A Species Addicted TV

Terence McKenna A Species Addicted; our addiction to objects which he calls object fetichism.

Why not live the adventure of creating and doing exactly what you love to do, and celebrating that everyone else is as well. None is to be privatized or controlled from an outside source with money trickling to this outside source, but kindled and honored and redistributed among all. With the priority being not to make an economic profit, but to have the best quality outdoor and indoor environments, the best quality of education, an emphasis towards local and diversification. A stress on creativity and autonomy among individuals who pull together, cooperatively sharing access to resources and benefits. With cohesion, respect and harmony and intimate interaction with all of the natural world. All of the living world adds delight and dimension to our beings, as we put our full awareness towards these with empathy and joy, with all of our senses. Hearing wind, birds, sensing moisture or heat, seeing the design of nature, smelling the fragrances of plants. The thought of doing anything that has a negative environmental impact to ruin our environment, would be as obvious as not putting waste on a valued space.

We can do it, collectively, because that is our nature. Homo sapiens thrive when cooperating. Not with heroes or figureheads pandering to the same old forged industrially, financially entangled world. We simply need to keep dynamically spreading our joy through being the best that we can actively be and imagine ourselves to be and to live celebrating this diversity of spirit among ourselves, rather than crushing or suppressing this.

Hazrat Inayat Khan, Resonance

Hazrat Inayat Khan quote Resonance

Incredibly, the first thing I saw when I was triggered to write this blog, was a quote from a Sufi master whose name I was familiar with. Several years ago I participated in a ‘Heart Rhythm Meditation’ course taught by a South African pediatrician at Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania. This meditation practice was influenced inspired by this Sufi musician, mystic, and healer Hazrat Inayat Khan.

“A person does not hear sound only through the ears; he hears sound through every pore of his body. It permeates the entire being, and according to its particular influence either slows or quickens the rhythm of the blood circulation; it either wakens or soothes the nervous system. It arouses a person to greater passions or it calms him by bringing him peace. According to the sound and its influence a certain effect is produced. Sound becomes visible in the form of radiance. This shows that the same energy which goes into the form of sound before being visible is absorbed by the physical body. In that way the physical body recuperates and becomes charged with new magnetism.” – Hazrat Inayat Khan

Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan Sufism and the Mysticism of Music, Charlie Sarafan, Infinity

Pir Vilayat Inayat Khan on Sufism and the Mysticism of Music interviewed by Charlie Sarafan for Infinity. Khan speaks of life as a vibration of wave-like patterns, all life having a signature vibration and frequency that can resonate with other life forms. “The tradition of Sufism has been accused of pantheism, as all is considered ‘god’. You can not divide the universe. In as much as something is a fraction of the universe, it has within it the potentiality of all the universe. The origin of all reality is wave-like. Every object in the world has a signature tune. When objects resonate, this is the key to the experience of relationship. One can heal bones by putting them into an electromagnetic field with the same signature vibration.”

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Batman hitting the earth with oil oozing out

Batman hitting the earth with oil oozing out

Carol Keiter the blogger

Carol Keiter the blogger