Health | Stretching & Exercising the Body and Mind | Farmacy

micro-nutrients, fruits, veggies

micro-nutrient dense foods fruits, veggies

Yet another article about the benefits of eating nutritional foods and incorporating spices regularly into your diet in order to maintain health and prevent dis ease.

Throw in stretching the body and the mind (meditation) and regular physical and mental exercise (active involvement of the brain through reading and thinking) and you’ve got a pretty healthy thing going. The rest is having a resilient attitude and lots of love and appreciation of what we have.

Interesting twist, this medical doctor, Dr. Weiss, stopped his practice to create a ‘farmacy’ cooperative in the state of New Jersey.

Dr. Weiss Ethos Health Farmacy

Dr. Weiss Ethos Health Farmacy

He looks a bit like Dr. Drew here in this pic, on his My Ethos Health FaceBook page. Not only is he growing the food, but educating his patients – the public – about the importance of eating properly. As a cooperative, he gives people the opportunity to voluntarily work on the farm; physically tending to the growing of the vegetables during which time they get physical exercise and work directly with the nutrients and bacteria present in the soil, which is healthy exposure itself.

micro-nutrients, beans, seeds, nuts

micro-nutrient dense foods beans, seeds, nuts

“The natural parts of plants contain nutrients that allow your body to heal. For example many foods such as turmeric act as an anti-inflammatory. Inflammation or swelling is believed to be the cause of many different chronic diseases.”

There’s a lot of information out there on the internet about healthy diets and the vitality of spices in dis-ease prevention.

This article talks about

G-BOMBS
Greens – Beans, Onions, Mushrooms, Berries, Seeds

6 nutrient-dense foods that are the basis for a healthy diet.

“While building-block nutrients—protein, carbohydrates, and fats—are essential, Americans are over-stuffing their diets with them and missing out on disease-fighting micronutrients like vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.”

Fabulous!

I personally only eat two meals a day: a hearty healthy breakfast with fresh fruit and grains and dinner, after fasting all day. My meal last evening featured the same foods mentioned in these articles; sweet potatoes, beans, kale salad with red beets and carrots, whole grain rice, nuts & seeds and lots of spices and veggies. I start the preparation of almost every meal sautéing plenty of onion in olive oil, which is when I add the various spices on low heat, to which I then add garlic and vegetables. For sure, I was educated when I lived in the quasi hippy / new age community of Taos, New Mexico where I learned a lot about the effectiveness of different herbs & spices. It didn’t hurt to live in San Francisco, known for its great cuisine and fabulous array of restaurants. Yet I’d say that one of the biggest contributors to my having a really healthy diet and maintaining a lean figure, I attribute to what I’ve called my ‘poverty diet’. I often bicycled to get around and didn’t have the extra cash to simply pop into a place to eat whenever I felt like it. Therefore, I’ve been accustomed to not eating for long periods of time during the day – certainly the opposite of overeating – and always preparing meals from scratch, no pre-pared on the shelf sauces or soups. Nutrient-dense foods are the key.

nutrients, garlic, onion, ginger, spices

nutrient dense foods garlic, onion, ginger, spices

Baked sweet potatoes (no butter or any dressing) and eating grains have been a regular part of my diet for years. I tend to go for spicy, not buttery. Since reading about the anti-inflammatory properties of Turmeric, i’ve been using that a lot more. Routinely use chili pepper, cayenne and lots of garlic.

More nuts and seeds – less cheese. However, if I lived in France with spectacular markets with displays of copious amounts of cheese and had a copious budget to match, I’d probably be all over it. Just add an additional glass of red wine to the meal. 🙂 Not sure I could go vegan.

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GDP | Gross Domestic Problem | Why the measurement of wealth depends on a healthy environment |

why trees matter | mushrooms offer solutions | Handprint | Gross National Happiness

When I walk or ride along streets basically every where, I look at trees as I pass them by. I see trees as elegant beings, that besides providing oxygen and shade and beauty, create a home for insects, birds and other animals. They are an integral part of what has created life as we know it on our planet.

This Op-Ed article in the New York times sparked my interest.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/12/opinion/why-trees-matter.html

Walnut tree in a gentleman's yard in Pennsylvania.

As this writer states, “In a bit of natural alchemy called photosynthesis, for example, trees turn one of the seemingly most insubstantial things of all — sunlight — into food for insects, wildlife and people, and use it to create shade, beauty and wood for fuel, furniture and homes.” Ah, and sunlight is hardly insubstantial – as I write about in my other blog regarding plasma cosmology and the electric universe theory.

“Decades ago, Katsuhiko Matsunaga, a marine chemist at Hokkaido University in Japan, discovered that when tree leaves decompose, they leach acids into the ocean that help fertilize plankton. When plankton thrive, so does the rest of the food chain.

Trees are nature’s water filters, capable of cleaning up the most toxic wastes, including explosives, solvents and organic wastes, largely through a dense community of microbes around the tree’s roots that clean water in exchange for nutrients, a process known as phytoremediation. Tree leaves also filter air pollution.”

I will let you read the rest of the article yourself, instead of copying and pasting it ‘-))

Yet, on the same subject, mushrooms also have the capacity to filter and clean toxicities out of the environment, as this article in UTNE reader demonstrates. “Mushrooms Offer Solutions for Environment and Economy

http://www.ted.com/talks/paul_stamets_on_6_ways_mushrooms_can_save_the_world.html?quote=294

An image of mycelium below.

“Human beings are more closely related to fungi, than they are to any other kingdom. Within a single cubic inch of soil, there can be 8 miles of these cells. Mycelium are externalized stomachs and lungs, essentially extended neurological membranes.” Paul goes on to say that mycelium form a fabric which is the biological version of earth’s natural internet. The internet, in turn, is man’s tool, or extension, which can be allocated to protect the biosphere”. It’s kind of like the concept that DNA replicates itself, in order for life to ultimately witness and see itself.

We can not measure the worth and wealth of a country or its peoples through qualifiers like the GDP, Gross Domestic Product; the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country’s borders, because this becomes a

Gross Domestic Problem

Gross Domestic Problem

Bhutan has a more enlightened way of approaching the subject, with the King’s assertion of a measure of Gross National Happiness!

Recognize that happiness and environmental health play a much larger role in the attributes which contribute to ‘quality of life’, than ‘wealth’, as measured by economic means alone. Bill McKibben who started 350.org contributed this article about the politics of global warming for the Rolling Stone magazine “Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math“.

We need to pay attention to our carbon footprint, showing the detrimental results of our actions on the environment as well as to actively become aware of our social handprint, revealing the benefits of our actions on nature; with the concept of balancing out what we take, through what we share and give!! Our handprint measures the positive impacts we can make, simply by changing the way we do things; at home, at work…

You can read more about this
http://challengingbehaviour.marketingmagazine.co.uk/2012/03/05/forget-your-carbon-footprint-whats-your-handprint/

Why does this matter? Because we don’t inhabit this planet alone.

http://www.joelsartore.com/galleries/the-photo-ark/