A Story about the Intelligence of Other Sentient Beings | BirdBrains

My sister told me this story today over the phone, when I mentioned that I come to this one spot to watch and count the birds that hang out always on the same wire at the same location, above this bridge. Oh, I get it, maybe people have thrown food over it at one time, or whatever, they like the sound of things walking or rolling over the wood.

She said that a friend of hers, years ago, who drove a truck as a AAA ‘rescue’ vehicle, was somewhere in the West, maybe Colorado. He told my sister that this one day, he was coming to an intersection that lasted, extraordinarily long. Each time the light changed and the cars were now given the green light, it would promptly change back to yellow and red.

As he literally inched his way closer to the intersection, he finally saw what was going on. A solitary Starling bird, with extraordinary intelligence, was snacking on a dead body in the center of the road. Each time the light was about to change, the bird flew the force of his body to spring off and press the button for pedestrians to Change the Traffic Light to allow pedestrian traffic. The Starling kept doing this repeatedly, so that he/she could get as many morsels of the meal in the middle of the road, without traffic impeding its dining progress.

I don’t know where the term bird brain came from, but this bird, and many birds, are way smarter than we give them credit for. I know that there are people sensitive, intuitive and aware enough to ‘communicate’ with all sorts of animals and birds.

Gosh, I hope for people to feel and ‘re cognize’ that the world in which we live, is not only about humans  and their endeavors and stuff, but one which is part of rich, interdependent fabric of life on this planet. All life forms with whom we share our planet deserve our admiration, awe, respect and devotion. Our actions should always be influenced with our perception of how it will affect other sentient beings. We are guardians of the habitat and survival, of all the other species on this planet. What a Wonderful World of life. 

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Migratory Starlings in Aix-en-Provence | Etourneaux | The Most Magnificent Site & Sound

I was sitting in this cafe and went outside for a pause. What? What in the world? Were these parrots? Birds at night in huge flocks like the parrots in San Francisco who found one another after each having escaped their cages?

The first person whom I asked, a young guy walking down the street in sports clothes, knew immediately the answer. He says that it happens twice a year in Aix-en-Provence. They are Etourneaux, I asked him to write it down for me. He then wrote down the English after looking it up on his phone.

Starling 'ballet' in danger as bird population declines

Starling ‘ballet’ in danger as bird population declines

I am in tears again as I read the headlines of this article in the Telegraph.

Starling populations migrate south and west in winter

Starling populations migrate south and west in winter

“The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) blames changes in intensive farming that means trees and hedges have been chopped down so there are fewer places for the birds to roost and breed. The use of chemicals and monoculture has also been blamed for reducing the amount of seeds and insects available for the animals to feed.”

Though I don’t have the equipment to record their sound. I was ASTOUNDED.

The ‘common’ starling. (Sturnus vulgaris), also known as the European starling, or in the British Isles just the starling, is a medium-sized passerine bird in the starling family, Sturnidae. I think it’s vulgar to call it common, the common starling, will be common no more, once they have all declined.

This bird is resident in southern and western Europe and southwestern Asia, while northeastern populations migrate south and west in winter within the breeding range and also further south to Iberia and North Africa.

They were moving – in the darkness – along the trees lining this very famous street. I found this video, which at least documents them.

Starlings Etourneaux Aix-en-Provence  Migratory birds which will return to Africa

Starlings Etourneaux Aix-en-Provence
Migratory birds which will return to Africa

Frankly, I found this to be the most magical thing I saw all day. I appear to need a new profession.

carol the blogger March 24th, 2017 in New Mexico

carol the blogger March 24th, 2017 in New Mexico